Summer Assortment in Wicker Hamper

May 24, 2010 at 3:58 pm | Posted in poetry, writing | 9 Comments
Tags: , , ,

With a volley of other eye words like aye aye capitan
we shall plot the demise of all rhyming silliness
and make a point west, or east, or at least
apply the principle of parsimony.
After all, one without the other? Absurd like a star
without a toe turned pebbleward and if I was less
than imitable I would not deserve your attentions
my darling, I shall spend my days concocting
drunken cartographers from whom we can expect
an endless source of unique ridiculousnesses
carefully arranged in wicker hampers
specifically designed to conflate integrity, pastry and influence.
And whilst I rue the lack of subtlety, tis true,
a perfect tune, these babble of voices, instigation,
echo, interpolation, lull, anticipation and reflection
cannot help but sing your praise and praise your song
and leave us unconditional.

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9 Comments »

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  1. Perfectly inextricable.
    Exactly

  2. cool and inexplicable
    infinitely immersible

  3. Paul & parsimony? Does not quite rhyme.
    Who complained about your writing again (that it is just for the sake of silly rhymes and language effects and they cannot understand it?)
    No-one ever criticises my poetry in public, Ana. Only behind my back, haha. Or maybe everybody likes it, who knows? I can’t help the rhyme irony, it just happens.

  4. If you do not log in… you see the ads. Laundry and Thorntons. I’ve always thought there should be a chocolate aroma’d washing powder. Imagine the dreams.
    Hmm, I shall.

  5. Scrumptious Mr Squires. I won’t use the g word or you may go off again. Conflate is a very interesting word with a sound almost opposite of it’s meaning. Did you mean to spell ‘imitable’ that way (proofreading). I look forward to reading the many tales of drunken cartographer ridiculousness’s.
    If you put drunken cartographer into the internal search engine, or any search engine you will find him ponderating and plotting, Gabrielle. He is always there. Conflate is a fabulous word. And yes, there is no such thing as a typo.

  6. Love the line:”cannot help but sing your praise and praise your song
    and leave us unconditional.”
    Thanks, Cocoyea. Pivot at the end, I call it.

  7. This poem leaves me feeling really good and was a treat to read. what wonderful flair and sense of fun it contains, yet tender. And I just adore “conflate integrity, pastry and influence” there’s a colorful tension in this that tickles my poetry bone (and makes me hungry). I really like your end-pivot technique too, I read your other post on the pivot move not too long ago, and how it has a different effect when executed in different places in a poem. I will try this its a nice move. Wonderful poem.
    It does make a difference. I like the pivot at the end, it makes for a neat feeling of completion, unconditional. Your latest is a real treat too, Harmonie. That tracing of the line of words reflecting the line of energy, I liked a lot.

  8. Dexterious invention of wordplay, as usual, has me quite cheerful and happy with you. I am wondering, Mr Paul, if you are the clever cat or the lusty pirate. Sometimes, I think, you are both.

  9. I always conflate pastry and influence which is why I’m in need of more exercise or less pastry. But only a little.

    If it were jazz I’d be a little sharp, but I’d rather be a little flat.

    This poem conflates all sorts of things, rather like a drunken cartographer. It should have a warning: “do not read without the companionship of a non-reading designated driver.” In comparison, so much else is just prose.

    A very wicker hamper, Paul.


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